Thomas Hill, The gardeners labyrinth..., 1577 - men enjoying wine and fruit, title-page of part 2.

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Date:1577

Description:Characters in Shakespeare enjoyed an arbour in their garden scenes.

The practice of enjoying the out-of-doors over a simple meal, or a drink out-of-doors on a summer’s evening may have been the setting Shakespeare had in mind for the Gloucestershire scenes of Henry IV, Part 2, (5,3, lines 1-72) where Shallow and Falstaff reminisce about their youth. A similar setting would have provided Don Pedro and his friends a suitable place to talk about Beatrice while knowing Benedick was eavesdropping nearby, in Much Ado About Nothing, 2,3, line 34.


Full title: Thomas Hill, The gardeners labyrinth: containing a discourse of the gardeners life in the yearly travels to be bestowed on his plot of earth... wherein are set forth divers hebers, knottes and mazes... also the physicke benefit of each herbe, plant and floure gathered... by Didymus Mountaine, London, Henry Bynneman, 1577.


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1570s
Henri Estienne, A mervaylous discourse upon... Katherine de Medici…, 1575 - title page
Henri Estienne, A mervaylous discourse upon... Katherine de Medici…, 1575 - title page

Shakespeare may have owned this book. Shakespeare purchased New Place, the largest ...

1590s
William Shakespeare, Venus and Adonis, 1594, leaf F4v.
William Shakespeare, Venus and Adonis, 1594, leaf F4v.

Shakespeare’s first published works. The long poem, Venus and Adonis, was ...

1610s
Plutarch, The lives of the noble Grecians and Romaines, 1612 - Antony and Cleopatra, p. 922, detail.
Plutarch, The lives of the noble Grecians and Romaines, 1612 - Antony and Cleopatra, p. 922, detail.

Shakespeare followed this description of Cleopatra. Shakespeare became very ...

1630s
William Shakespeare, Love's Labour's Lost, 1631 - Act 4 begins with after dinner discussion
William Shakespeare, Love's Labour's Lost, 1631 - Act 4 begins with after dinner discussion

Shakespeare’s schoolteacher is parodied. Much of the comedy in Love’s ...

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Donor ref:SR 97.3 [30,078] (32/10545)

Source: The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust - Library

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